Features | From Pivot Magazine

The most outlandish recent shams and scams 

A round-up of frauds, including a pizza delivery scheme and a swindler who posed as the premier of Newfoundland and Labrador  

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Edmonton Oiler Connor McDavid “It’s important to me that fans and collectors aren’t getting taken advantage of,” Edmonton Oiler Connor McDavid said in a statement after a local man was arrested for selling the star centre’s jerseys with forged autographs (Getty)

470,000

Restitution that a Winnipeg financial adviser must pay after defrauding his clients, including his own girlfriend, to fund a gambling addiction. He was ­sentenced to 27 months in prison.

3

Number of Toronto-area scammers who posed as pizza delivery drivers in July. The suspects would allegedly trail a real delivery driver, pretend to be the order’s recipients outside the address and pay for the pizza in cash. Then, impersonating the driver, they’d knock on the door, record the actual customer’s PIN, discretely swap their bankcard with a decoy and use it to withdraw cash at a nearby ATM.

“IT’S IMPORTANT TO ME THAT FANS AND COLLECTORS AREN’T GETTING TAKEN ADVANTAGE OF”

Statement from Edmonton Oiler Connor McDavid after a local man was arrested for selling the star centre’s jerseys with forged autographs. One victim lost $23,000 in the con.

“BUT IT ME, YOU ARE SPEAKING TO THE REAL ME”

Message that a swindler posing as Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball sent to a skeptical islander, who responded, “Then why do you have typos?” The recipient was one of a number of people that the impersonator contacted on Facebook this past summer, coaxing them to divulge personal information for undisclosed reasons.

150

Number of workers who quit or were fired from Baycrest, a geriatric health centre in Toronto, after an independent auditor discovered they had cumulatively billed for as much as $5 million in bogus health benefit claims.

$291,000

Amount that a 60-year-old woman recently lost in an online romance scam. The suspected culprit, a 24-year-old Vaughan, Ont., woman who now faces six fraud-related charges, posed as a wealthy architect—though, apparently, not wealthy enough.

FRAUD FIGHTERS

#NANASAYS

The Vancouver Police Department’s new online-fraud awareness campaign, which features videos of a grandmother texting advice to millennials about shady Craigslist sales and fake CRA calls.

$20,000

Amount that a scammer asked Calgarian Ben Perrins to invest in a shady Bitcoin scheme, promising huge returns. Perrins, who coincidentally works at a cryptocurrency exchange, feigned ignorance and conned the con man, asking him to send him US$50 to prove his legitimacy. Perrins then dropped the act, reported the scam and gave the money to charity.