Features | From Pivot Magazine

Rosoleen Rutherford

A bookworm and aspiring author, Rutherford works for DMCL, a mid-sized accounting practice in Greater Vancouver

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Rosoleen Rutherford: “There are always going to be people left behind, and they’re the ones we need to help.” (Photograph by Troy Moth)

Age 36 / Surrey, British Columbia
Senior accountant at DMCL

WHY ACCOUNTING

Rutherford was born in Greece, lived in Indonesia and eventually settled in Nanaimo, B.C. She dreamed of becoming an archa­eologist (“but it was terribly boring”), then worked in retail and restaurants before going back to university, where she took an accounting elective. “I felt pretty silly being 28 and not knowing what an income statement or balance sheet was.” But once she got the hang of it, she was hooked; it felt like solving a puzzle. 

WHAT SHE’S DOING NOW

Rutherford works for DMCL, a mid-sized accounting practice in Greater Vancouver. She pursued a CPA designation because, wherever she’s worked with accountants, she’s found it to be an inclusive work environment with rewarding challenges.

WHERE SHE SEES HERSELF IN 10 YEARS

In five years, Rutherford hopes to be a manager at DMCL, so that she can support accounting students and cultivate a fun work environment. She plans to get another designation, too. “Accounting is such a vast field and there’s so much to know, so having another designation will give me confidence to provide more tailored services.”

ON THE FUTURE OF ACCOUNTING

“Change is inevitable,” she says. “Technology constantly gets blamed for job losses, but society has always been able to adapt.” She predicts tech like AI will create new accounting jobs and value-added consulting services, and commends organizations like CPA Canada for providing ongoing education. “There are always going to be people left behind, and they’re the ones we need to help.”

HOBBY

A bookworm and aspiring author, she’s spent countless nights reading until sunrise. “That’s why I can’t read during tax season!”