Planning act

When it comes to household planning, most Canadians choose one or two financial priorities for any given year. Reducing debt, saving for retirement or buying a home are often top of mind.

1: Rank of paying down debt among all financial concerns of Canadians in 2014. A CIBC poll found Albertans were most concerned about debt, while Quebecers and British Columbians were least concerned.

19: Percent of low-income Canadians in 1997 who were able to put money aside for financial priorities. “[They]… have virtually identical long-term financial goals as Canadians at higher income brackets,” said an Institute of Canadian Bankers spokesperson. “These include financial security, saving for retirement, home ownership and children’s education.”

25 to 30: Age at which new university graduates expect to purchase their first home. A 2008 BMO survey found 62% of grads felt a down payment for a home was a top financial priority.

30: Percent of Canadians for whom paying off debt was their top priority in 1992; 22% of “recession weary” consumers delayed major purchases and 19% cancelled vacations.

55: Percent of women who worry about money, according to a 2013 survey of Canadians. Among men, 45% admitted to worrying about their finances

59: Percent of Canadian parents who said one of their top hopes for their children is to be free of financial worries, according to a 2014 poll by Invesco Canada.

70: Percent of 25- to 34-year-olds saving for retirement, according to a 2007 Edward Jones survey. Only 25% of respondents 50 or older said they had reserves for retirement at that same age.

About the Author

Steve Brearton


Steve Brearton is a freelance writer in Toronto.

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