Financial literacy

Join CPA Canada and our expert bloggers as we share our top tips and personal stories about money to help you get on the right track to making smart financial decisions.

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Many of us find ourselves in the same financial rut over and over again. The following blog post offers tips on improving your financial wellness.

It is important for your business to comply with tax regulations. Here is a brief walk-through of basic tax matters to ensure your business stays tax-compliant.

Accounting is a core component of any successful business. Find out what you need to know about basic accounting for your business venture to thrive.

While credit, debts and income have a major impact on your ability to obtain a mortgage, there are other issues that affect your eligibility. Learn what to consider before applying for a mortgage.

When you find that home you’ve always dreamed of purchasing, are you prepared to qualify for the mortgage? Learn about the key steps to take before shopping for your home.

Learn about the effects of commuting in a personal vehicle on our physical and mental well-being.

Canadians spend around 20 per cent of their take-home pay on car ownership while under the impression that the vehicle costs far less. Why is there a gap between actual costs and what we think we spend?

In part 1 of this blog post, we examined how to evaluate the potential profitability, and hence the success, of a prospective business. In part 2, we examine key aspects of setting up a business.

Financial independence is critical for individuals throughout their lives. Here are some important ways you can get your kids to think smartly about money from a very early age.

Many self-employed professionals and some employees who do not have employee benefits rely on their spouse for health and dental coverage. Are you aware of the limitations of your spouse’s coverage?

Many Canadians have employee benefits plans including life insurance. Do you know how much or the type of insurance you need? Many people do not.

Buying the “latest and greatest” products might feel exciting, but it could cost you big time — and not just in terms of price.

Learn about the facts regarding Canadian caregivers and financial factors to consider when faced with caring for an aging family member.

Child care expenses may be deductible for tax purposes, but there are some exceptions. Learn how to identify limitations and plan efficiently.

Parents can ready their children for future financial security by regularly investing over their lifetime. What questions should you ask yourself when contributing to your children's savings plans?

Think twice, ask questions and investigate before responding to an email or phone request. Never give out your credit card number over the phone or on an unknown website.

We don’t mean to, but parents can inadvertently pass along financial biases and reinforce widespread money myths. Here are some of the most common.

In Crowdfunding 101, we got you up to speed with what crowdfunding is. Crowdfunding 102 provides basic steps to follow if you’re considering trying it out for your latest venture.

Do you have a money hangover after spending your way through December? Here are a few simple ways to get your finances back on track this month

Crowdfunding is a hot topic. It suddenly feels like everyone is talking about it, yet you haven’t gotten on the bandwagon. You’re dying to know—what exactly is crowdfunding?!

According to Statistics Canada, gift giving is a billion-dollar industry and consumers are paying for it well into the new year. Here are some money-saving tips to control spending and think like Scrooge.

Check out these age-appropriate activities for financial literacy month

Any time is a good time to look at your personal finances. But since November is financial literacy month in Canada, why not take the opportunity to cross one money goal off your to-do list?

You’ve already done your homework from Part 1 and have the foundation ready to prepare a comprehensive financial plan. Now, Part 2 explains how to make, implement and monitor that plan.

Comprehensive financial planning encompasses all aspects of financial, and even non-financial affairs, irrespective of how the markets perform. Learn how you can gain peace of mind about your financial future.

Deciding how much allowance to give a child is a personal decision, but we’ve compiled the statistics on what other parents are dishing out, as a handy reference.

It’s tough enough to get kids in the habit of saving money for a specific goal — let alone putting cash aside for a rainy day. As always, experience is the finest teacher.

Despite the stereotype of seniors being most vulnerable to fraud, teens and young adults are actually more likely to lose money in a financial scam.

It’s back to school season again and we can dream about our children’s future, which often includes a post-secondary education. But, how do we pay for it? An RESP could be the answer.

Striving to match the lifestyle of family, friends and neighbours — and their kids — can be a dangerous pursuit, both in financial and emotional terms.

A U.K. study found that boys get 12 per cent more, on average, in weekly allowance than girls do. The reason why is simple — and it can teach us all a valuable lesson.

Parents and educators have long known that comic books can improve children’s reading literacy. Now there’s one that can boost their financial literacy, too.

With Canadian consumer debt at an all-time high and now the highest per capita in the world, bankruptcies are rising before interest rates have risen.

It’s a good idea to periodically take stock of where children are on the road to becoming money-smart. Here’s where my son is at.

Many of us have no control over increasing our income, but all of us have 100 per cent control over our spending.

A CPA and his eight-year-old daughter prove that early exposure to numbers, math and financial concepts can reap remarkable rewards.

It’s that time of year again. Here are some of the more common tax credits and deductions parents should look into before filing their annual income tax returns.

What would you do if your smartphone got into the wrong hands? Is it password protected? What if someone bypassed the protection? Let’s look at ways to protect it.

Research shows that learning more math has a positive impact on students’ financial outcomes.

After you have taken inventory or assessed your current financial fitness, it's time to put an action and training plan into place that will help you achieve some specific financial goals this year

The push in the new year is to set New Year’s resolutions, and often the focus is on losing weight or earning more money. I would like to advocate becoming more financially fit.

Does financial planning scare you? Does it give you a sick feeling in the pit of your stomach? If it does, that’s probably because you don’t have a financial plan.

Delaying gratification isn’t easy, but it’s an essential milestone for kids on the road to becoming money smart.

As we head toward the holidays, money, and how we spend it, can either brighten the festivities, or make them more challenging. This season can be one of good cheer with some think-ahead financial planning.

There are some great games available that can help kids learn financial concepts while having fun. Here are a few of our favourites.

Advertisers are experts at getting us to shop, so warn your kids about their wily ways.

I want to share some reasons why retirement planning should be a priority because procrastinating can lead to some unpleasant surprises in your golden years.

How many of us even open our investment statement? And how many of us actually understand it? Let’s look at the major sections and answer the most common questions.

Parent groups have been asking for more financial education in the classroom. But at least one money lesson will always be in the hands of parents.

Before you hit the back-to-school sales, consider this simple trick to help your child learn a key financial lesson.

Parents may not want to discuss past financial hardships with their children, but at least one personal finance expert thinks they should.

Summer provides plenty of opportunities for teachable moments as families spend more time together in a relaxed atmosphere. Here are a few valuable financial lessons parents can pass on to their kids this season.

Every now and then, stories come out in the news about kids who unwittingly rack up hundreds of dollars in purchases on their parents smart phone or tablet, by downloading or playing apps that automatically bill the parents' credit card.

Three years on I can say that we’ve been wildly successful meeting the first objective.

More than a third (38 per cent) of Canadian parents say they, or someone they know, went into debt to put a child in extracurricular activities.

Between credit cards, debit cards, online payments and gift cards, we just don’t use cold hard cash very often.

A great lesson about advertisers’ efforts to get us to part with our money.

44% of Canadians polled in a national survey for the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada actually did receive a windfall this year, in the form of an income tax refund.

Here are a few basic financial concepts you can introduce to your kids this Halloween, without spoiling any of their fun.

Are girls as young as seven being conditioned to view trendy clothing, cosmetics and spa treatments as needs rather than wants, which undermines their ability to save money and learn financial smarts?

I must admit, I never really considered my nightly ritual of reading to Adam as an opportunity to teach him about money.

Yes, my son was in hock before he made it out of kindergarten.

If you have young kids, try talking to them about money and a budget — in regards to public finances or, even better, your own.

My husband, Geoff, and I decided to give Adam $2 a week so he could save up to buy new games.

As our kids head back to school, it’s natural to wonder where their education will lead.

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