Kevin Leyton-Brown

Kevin is a professor of computer science at the University of British Columbia and an associate member of the Vancouver School of Economics. He holds a PhD and MSc from Stanford University and a BSc from McMaster University. He studies the intersection of computer science and microeconomics, addressing computational problems in economic contexts and incentive issues in multiagent systems. He also applies machine learning to the automated design and analysis of algorithms for solving hard computational problems.

Kevin has co-taught two courses on game theory to over half a million students. He received UBC’s 2013/14 Killam Teaching Prize in 2013/2014 and its Charles A. McDowell Award for Excellence in Research in 2015, a E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada in 2014, and an Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize from the Canadian Association of Computer Science in 2013.

Kevin has co-written two books, Multiagent Systems and Essentials of Game Theory, and over 100 peer-refereed technical articles. He serves as an associate editor for Artificial Intelligence Journal, ACM Transactions on Economics and Computation and AI Access, and serves as an advisory board member for the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research. Kevin is chair of the ACM Special Interest Group on Electronic Commerce, which runs the annual Conference on Economics and Computation, and was program chair for the ACM Conference on Electronic Commerce in 2012.

He currently advises Auctionomics, Inc. (and through them, the Federal Communications Commission) and Qudos Inc. He is a co-founder of Kudu.ug and Meta-Algorithmic Technologies. In the past, he served as a consultant for Zynga Inc., Trading Dynamics Inc., Ariba Inc., Cariocas Inc., and was scientific advisor to UBC spinoff Zite Inc. until it was acquired by CNN in 2011.

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